Join our mailing list!










You are here:Home > Blending & Roasting
 
Blending, The secret of Douwe Egberts coffee

It's important to remember that coffee is a natural product, therefore no two harvests are the same. In order to produce the optimum flavour, various types of coffee beans are blended together.

The aim of blending coffee is to ensure that the flavour and aroma are consistent throughout the year. The Douwe Egberts master blenders use their experience & expertise to adjust the mix of coffee types to ensure your coffee has the same great taste every time you drink it.

Roasting coffee - release the flavour

The Hidden Flavour - Coffee's characteristic flavour and aroma only develop during the roasting process. Roasting green coffee beans sets a series of complex chemical reactions in motion, it's these reactions that release the flavour that's hidden within each bean.

The Art of Roasting - The roasting of coffee beans is an art as much as a science. Beans react differently to the roasting process, it depends on the soil and weather conditions in which they were grown as well as the processing method used. Our experienced roasters adjust the roasting time & temperature to ensure they get the best taste out of each batch of beans.

Up to 500 °C - During roasting, the green beans are exposed to very high temperatures in excess of 500 degrees celsius. The temperature inside the bean rises to between 200 - 250 degrees celsius, it's this temperature that brings about the chemical reactions.

Aromatic Oils - As the moisture evaporates the aromatic oils contained in the coffee beans are released, the sugar in the beans then start to caramelise, this is what gives the coffee beans their distinct flavour and deep brown colour. The final stage involves the coffee beans being moistened with water, then they are cooled using cold air.

Three Types of Roasting

The temperature & length of roasting determines the strength of the final flavour, each country has it's own preference.

Light or blonde roasting gives coffee a mild flavour, this is popular in Scandinavia for example.

Medium roasting produces a somewhat stronger flavour & is popular in Central Europe and the USA.

Dark roasting results in very strong intense flavoured coffee intended to be drunk black, this tends to suit Southern European tastes.